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First co-hosted Rehabilitation Science Colloquium by Queen's University and McGill University

On behalf of the planning committee, we are pleased to invite you to the first Rehabilitation Science Research Colloquium co-hosted by Queen’s University and McGill University on Tuesday and Wednesday May 11th-12th. The theme for this year’s colloquium is “Resilience in Rehabilitation,” highlighting both the resilience seen in our research and the resilience shown by our achievements in the context of the adversity faced by students this past year.

This year, Queen’s School of Rehabilitation Therapy and McGill School of Physical and Occupational Therapy made the decision to come together to create a virtual colloquium to ensure the successful continuation of our individual colloquiua. Representatives from both schools have been working hard to organize this two-day event. Keynote speakers, Dr. Linna Tam-Seto (a post-graduate fellow at the Centre for International and Defence Policy at Queen’s), and Dr. Navaldeep Kaur (a postdoctoral fellow at the Department of Physical Therapy at the University of Toronto) will discuss resilience in their work, both as individuals and as researchers.

Graduate students from McGill and Queen’s will be joined from students across Canada to present research highlighting the diversity in rehabilitation. Topics will include movement rehabilitation, academic perspectives on rehabilitation, uniform-connected rehabilitation, influencing factors in rehabilitation, stakeholders in rehabilitation, biomechanical assessment in rehabilitation and neurological rehabilitation.

We are very excited to share this celebration of research trainees and collaboration with you. For more information or to register, please visit our website: event.fourwaves.com/rehabcolloquium

We hope to see you there,

The Rehabilitation Science Research Colloquium Committee.

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